How Travelling Changed Our Lives Forever

Travel is one of the few experiences that transforms your life. It’s impact is felt to the very core as your whole perspective on life changes. You emerge changed, almost reborn into a newer, better version of yourself. It happens gradually when you travel, then POW! It hits you when you return. You realise nothing has changed. Your friends are doing the same thing, your home is the same, the job you left is the same. But you’re not the same. You feel restless, impatient and disappointed that the return is such an anticlimax to a mind-blowing experience. Nobody understands. You want to get back on a plane. You ask yourself, how and why did this experience have such a profound effect? Was it the trekking in the Himalayas that did it? Or was it the cute Orangutan in Borneo! Did skydiving in New Zealand really do this or was it listening to the stories of a stranger in Burma. You know – it was all these things and more. Here’s how travelling changed our lives forever.

We  learned a lot about ourselves

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Travelling was tough. Catching many flights across different time-zones, not sleeping properly for days, long uncomfortable train journeys and flight delays. Add to that death-defying taxi rides, near misses, slips and falls and lugging your back-pack around in unbearable temperatures was definitely character building. On many occasions we went hungry, got food poisoning (mostly me) and had to visit doctors on several occasions. All this taught to us to adapt to situations, not worry about things and continue moving forward.

Travel inspired us to make big changes in our lives

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On returning, being tied to a corporate didn’t seem so great. So I took a leap of faith. I started a business. It was nerve-wracking to give up the stability of a permanent job but I couldn’t let the experience of travelling just fade away into a memory.

Our perspective on the world changed

Village children having fun with the camera

Yes – travelling turned our world upside down! Like most people, we had  a 9-5 job, got married and had a home. However, after living out of a backpack for almost a year and experiencing the freedom that travel offers, you realise you don’t have to be pigeon – holed into living a life that involves just working and paying bills.  The definition of living changed for us. Travelling was true living. Experiencing and engaging everything the world had to offer and growing as a person was a revelation.

We appreciate life more

One of my favourite pictures!

You have back-packers then you have flash-packers. I guess we were flash-packers as we never stayed in dorms or real hell holes! Saying that we came across a few grim places in an effort to save money. In the end it taught us to appreciate what we have. These days, we have shorter showers, watch less TV and spend less money. We appreciate the seasons and use our time more constructively.

We’ve made friends from all over the world

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It starts with a drink (or three) and ends with a promise to stay in touch. Next thing you know, you’re in another country and so are they! That’s when you know you’ve connected with friends. Interacting with strangers on the road does wonders for your social skills. There’s no hiding when you travel.

We’ve developed a taste for global food

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Eating our way across Asia was one of the joys of travelling. The food is inspiring, cheap and delicious!  So much so I decided to take a cookery class in Nepal, Thailand and Malaysia. Mealtimes are not the same anymore. You’ll often find Morning Glory with garlic & chilli or red fish curry on the menu. I really miss chicken Momo’s so that’s next on the shopping list!

We realised all you need is a back-pack

A quick photo on arrival at Lhasa

You start with loads of stuff in your backpack but you soon come to realise you don’t need it. I actually ended up with less clothes than Asad. If I needed anything I’d just buy it. Carrying the bare minimum was cathartic and empowering. On returning I found I was less attached to our material possessions. Even our home.  It didn’t mean as much to me. Spending almost a year among vast landscapes in Asia meant we felt trapped by the tiny surroundings of the UK. It took us a long time to adjust.

We discovered what it means to be in the present

The Heavely Annapurna Circuit

We are all raised to constantly think of the future. What’s going to happen in the next hour, day, week or year. We plan our lives around this, running around leading busy lives-  barely taking time to stand still and just be present in the moment. Sometimes we pay others to tell us to stand still.   That’s why travelling stops you in your tracks and forces you to take a look at how crazy beautiful the earth is!

We have more of respect for nature

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We’ve seen a lot of wildlife and nature on our travels. From the Orangutans in Borneo to the Proboscis Monkey’s and birdlife down the Kinabatangan river. We’ve seen chickens ritually killed by shamans and tens of buffalo slaughtered by tribes in Sulawesi. We’ve bathed elephants in Chiang Mai and experienced dolphins and whales in New Zealand. It’s a privilege to share the earth with such amazing creatures.

Our thirst for travel never died, it just got stronger

Asad at Tashilunpo Monastery

You would think that a year and a half later, the urge to travel would fade and we would slot right back into our lives in the UK. But it hasn’t. A day doesn’t go by when I don’t think of getting on a plane and just going somewhere. Sometimes I wish we didn’t feel that way. It’s unsettling and we both still suffer from a restless desire to just pack up and go!

We discovered our adventurous side

Asad Skydiving - New Zealand

We went mental in New Zealand. Probably because we bumped into a friend who was a bit of an adrenaline junkie. Before you know it, Asad had performed a skydive, I had ziplined and paraglided my way over the Remarkables.  We would never have even contemplated any of this before!  It just goes to show that the confidence you gain enables you in so many ways.

We learned people are the same

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People are the same the world over. It doesn’t matter what religion or race you are, everyone has the same needs. Everyone works,  looks after their families, plays candy crush and enjoys a good drink! Everywhere we travelled people received us with an open-heart. Strangers shared their food and stories with us. In China we felt like celebrities. They were intrigued by us. Asians with a British accent.  Even in remote areas where the locals were not used to tourists, people may have been reserved but there was never any hostility. We’ve learned that people are essentially good. Even in countries such as Myanmar (Burma) who only opened their doors to the world in the past few years, people were friendly and warm. I miss that.

We learned religion is more diverse than we thought

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We experienced alot of Buddhism and Hinduism across South-East Asia. But Indonesia was really amazing. Bali had such a diverse form of Hinduism, nothing like you see in India or Nepal.  Sulawesi was breathtaking and threw the usual concept of religion out of the window. Mosques displayed ancient Torajan symbols and some Christians still practiced cliff-burials.  It was all surreal and magical.

The planet we live on is an amazing place. Go see it with an open heart and an open mind and I promise it will teach you something no book or university will.

Let us know what you think of this post! We’d love to hear from you.

 

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “How Travelling Changed Our Lives Forever

  1. You bring such good memories and the fact that the experiences are the travels, not the destination. Back home in Canada, back working full time BUT still feeling aware of the greater world out there — I barely go shopping for “stuff” anymore because I have plenty and I don’t need anything newer, bigger, latest etc, I cringe at the price of a hotel room — really, it’s just a bed and bathroom — and tend to couchsurf instead to meet locals; and I remain forever grateful for the abilityto turn on my tap, sip the water without having to treat it and take a shower and the water is hot instantly. And as you write, ultimately, it’s about the people you meet and the shared experiences. Nothing can take that away!! Now, onto a more important question: Are you interested in meeting me and some friends in Nepal next year, 2017, maybe September, 4 weeks, to do the Annapurna Basecamp and/or Langtang Trail and then maybe a foray into India or Bhutan???

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    1. Thanks for reading Ariela! I hear you about the shopping and the hotel rooms. As for meeting up in Nepal OMG!! Only now I was just thinking about Nepal. Would I like to meet you – hell yes! I’ll have to have a chat with Castro (hehe) and get back to you. I’ll email you! ;))

      Like

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